Myofunctional Services
Infant OroBlend Assessment

Infant OroBlend Assessment

This is an infant Orofacial Myofunctional and Tethered Oral Tissues (oral ties) Assessment. This includes tongue, lips and buccal ties, and orofacial disorders.

After the assessment, a set of recommendations and blended techniques will be provided to get you and your baby started.

Up to1 hour £260

Subsequent appointments are 30 minutes long and charged at £130 pay as you go or 10% off for a package of 6 sessions (£702)

Is Infant OroBlend Assessment right for me?

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Common Questions about Tongue Tie

 
WHAT IS TONGUE TIE?

Tongue-tie is a popular term used to characterize a common condition that often goes undetected. It occurs during pregnancy when a small portion of tissue that should disappear during the infant’s development remains at the bottom of the tongue, restricting its movement.
 
WILL THE TONGUE AND FRENULUM BE INSPECTED AS SOON AS THE BABY IS BORN?
Yes, but there are varying degrees of tongue-tie, so the importance of having a test or validated protocol that evaluates the tongue and the “trickle” under the tongue (lingual frenulum) is crucial, as well as the way the infant sucks. This will ensure an accurate diagnosis, and indicate whether or not the need to do a frenotomy (or small “cut” under the tongue) is recommended.
HOW AND WHEN SHOULD TONGUE-TIE BE TREATED?
When the tongue cannot perform all the necessary movements and thus jeopardizes the way of sucking, swallowing, chewing or talking, a small surgery or frenotomy in the tongue is indicated. The “cut” of the frenum in infants is a simple procedure done with scissors, scalpel, or laser and anesthetic gel, which lasts about five minutes. In older children and adults the most common procedure is the frenectomy (partial removal of the lingual frenulum).
WHEN IS A SURGICAL PROCEDURE INDICATED TO RELEASE THE LINGUAL FRENULUM?
In infants, surgery is usually indicated when the lingual frenulum restricts the tongue’s movement and compromises breastfeeding. In older children and adults, the indication is made when the tongue is visibly restricted, is unable to adequately reach the palate, or when possible distortions in speech are caused by limitation of the elevation of the tongue tip (especially in producing the sound of the “L” and “R”) that could not be corrected in speech therapy. A lactation consultant may also be indicated for consultation.
WHAT CAN HAPPEN WITH AN INFANT IF NOT TREATED?
Many people with tongue-tie suffer the consequences without knowing the cause. There are infants who have changes in the feeding cycle, causing stress for the infant and for the mother; there are also children with difficulties in chewing, children and adults with speech problems affecting communication, social relationships and professional development. With the chronic oral rest posture of the tongue in the floor of the mouth, many of the Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders (OMDs) enumerated above may result.

AFTERCARE

There are two important concepts to understand about oral wounds:

  1. Any open oral wound likes to contract towards the center of that wound as it is healing (hence the need to keep it dilated open).

  2. If you have two raw surfaces in the mouth in close proximity, they will reattach.

Post-procedure stretches are key to getting an optimal result. These stretches are NOT meant to be forceful or prolonged. It's best to be quick and precise with your movements. Getting an affordable LED headlight (like a camping headlight) allows better visibility. You may use Calpol, Ibuprofen (if 6 months of age or older), arnica, Rescue Remedy or other measures to help with pain control. Organic coconut oil, can also be safely used in the mouth following the procedure.

The main risk of a frenotomy is that the mouth heals so quickly that it may prematurely reattach at either the tongue site or the lip site, causing a new limitation in mobility and the persistence or return of symptoms.

 

WOUND

A small amount of spotting or bleeding is common after the procedure, especially in the first few days. Because a laser is being used, bleeding is minimized. Wash your hands well prior to your stretches (gloves aren't necessary). Apply a small amount of the coconut oil to your finger prior to your stretches.

TIMING: DO ONE STRETCH ON THE EVENING OF SURGERY. THEN, SKIP AHEAD TO THE NEXT MORNING (KEEP IN MIND THAT THIS IS THE ONLY TIME THAT YOU SHOULD SKIP THE OVERNIGHT STRETCH). It is recommendationed that stretches be done 6x/day for the first 3 weeks, and then spending the 4th week quickly tapering from 6 to 5 to 4 to 3 to 2 to 1 per day before quitting completely at the end of the 4th week. It's easier for parents to do 5 of the stretches during their waking hours and one of those stretches in the middle of the night. You don't have to wake up your baby for the stretches, These can often. be done while the baby is asleep. Take care to not go more than 6 hours between stretches. Nappy changes are a good time to do the exercises.